Hiroshima - John Hersey

Hiroshima

By John Hersey

  • Release Date: 2015-08-14
  • Genre: Military
Score: 4
4
From 67 Ratings

Description

Hiroshima is John Hersey's timeless and compassionate account of the catastrophic event which heralded the coming of the atomic age. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author went to Japan, while the ashes of Hiroshima were still warm, to interview the survivors of the first atomic bombing. His trip resulted in this world-famous document, the most significant piece of journalism of modern times. "Nothing that can be said about this book," The New York Times wrote, "can equal what the book has to say. It speaks for itself, and in an unforgettable way, for humanity."

Reviews

  • Hiroshima

    5
    By Sasha Painindiaz
    In a time of nuclear blustering and threats of raining down fire the likes the world has never seen, it would be wise for the leaders of the world to take the time to read this book. These survivors saw fire rain down upon them and changed their lives and their world forever.
  • Awful

    1
    By Z_swagdaddy
    Don't read
  • Mistakes

    2
    By Kirwashere
    Many mistakes in the grammar
  • Many typos in conversion to digital; not original

    1
    By Number#1FAN<3
    I am reviewing the actual version of this book, which, for some reason, is encumbered with spelling mistakes, grammatical errors, and typos not present in the print editions. However, the book itself, is a quick read that sticks with you forever. I first read it in the with grade and reread it out of curiosity after finding that the New Yorker did a full page oped on its release. This book is pivotal to understanding desensivity of mass murder and destruction. It is written from a cool, distant narration that follows historical non fiction stories of survivors, which is particularly partial to Christianity and Catholic priests. At the time of its release, relating the Japanese as Christians with little regard to Japanese reality and relation to their actual religious belief system. It's obvious, though, that this book became the narrative of understanding to nearly every American's mind. Had this book not been written as it was, it is possible that Americans would not have been able to forge an American and Japanese alliance. This book is gruesome. Sad. Depressing. Terrifying. While the characters aren't real, what they represent is very much near to accuracy.
  • a worthwhile read

    5
    By bad_guppy
    a good, grounded view of personal experiences during and after the bombing of Hiroshima. it showed the death and casualties in a personal way, and giving names to both those who survived and those who did not. what bravery and resilience these japanese showed during a time of horror and terror. then their disbelief when it happened again in nagasaki. may it never happen again.
  • Missing chapter

    1
    By Brotherman Phill
    This book doesn't even have the last chapter (chapter 5) -_-